Browse Prior Art Database

Photoluminescent Optical Sensor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080027D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schaaf, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

This optical sensor receives a serial type light source, such as a television type raster light beam, and reads an opaque image, providing a time sampled image output signal.

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Photoluminescent Optical Sensor

This optical sensor receives a serial type light source, such as a television type raster light beam, and reads an opaque image, providing a time sampled image output signal.

Fig. 1 shows a cutaway portion of the sensor. Transparent organic phosphor particles 10 are dispersed uniformly throughout plastic film 11. The edge of this film carries an opaque photoconductor 12, best seen in Fig. 2. This plastic film is sandwiched between two fiber optic sheets 13 and 14, best seen in Fig. 3. These sheets are formed of a number of vertically oriented optic fibers.

The upper glass sheet 13 is illuminated by any device capable of moving light beam 15 across the sheet in raster fashion, as indicated by arrows 16 and 17 in Fig. 2.

This moving light beam is preferably short-wavelength visible light, which is capable of reflecting off the image being read in proportion to the density of the image.

A portion 18 of light beam 15 is absorbed by the transparent phosphor. Yet another portion 19 passes through the phosphor layer and glass 14 to be reflected off an opaque image, such as book 20 shown in Fig. 3. A portion 22 of this reflected image generated light strikes the transparent phosphor.

This phosphor is a photoluminescent type which absorbs ultraviolet or short- wavelength visible light and emits larger-wavelength visible light as a result thereof. This larger-wavelength light is radiated in all directions, as indicated by arrows 23 in Fig. 1...