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Dressing a Grading Wheel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080028D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Robinson, NL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Contoured grinding wheels are utilized to produce complementary contours in a workpiece. Irregularities in the grinding wheel result in incorrect contours in the workpiece. Where the grinding wheel is composed of diamond dust in a binder matrix, its contour can be trued utilizing this technique.

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Dressing a Grading Wheel

Contoured grinding wheels are utilized to produce complementary contours in a workpiece. Irregularities in the grinding wheel result in incorrect contours in the workpiece. Where the grinding wheel is composed of diamond dust in a binder matrix, its contour can be trued utilizing this technique.

The grinding wheel is cast as closely as possible to its final size, shape and contour. Then the contour of the grinding surface is trued using an abrasive paste and a metal pin, having the contour characteristics and dimensions desired to be formed in the workpiece.

For example, where a grinding wheel 2 is to be used to form a convex surface on a workpiece, not shown, its grinding perimeter 3 is concave. The contour is trued by mounting a metal pin 4 a small distance from the perimeter of wheel 3, rotating the wheel and feeding an abrasive paste 5 to the leading edge of the pin. As shown at the cutaway, the rotation of the wheel 2 causes the abrasive paste to be forced through the gap between the wheel and the pin 4. As paste 5 is forced through the gap, it erodes the binder matrix of the wheel, thus allowing the diamond particles to be carried away.

An abrasive paste composed of silicon carbide particles in ethylene glycol, for example, is useful in trueing a diamond grinding wheel having an epoxy binder. Spacing between the pin and the wheel on the order of about 0.0005 inch is suitable. Wheel rotation of 100 RPM, or less, is sufficient. Variat...