Browse Prior Art Database

Wide Dynamic Range Transducer Amplifier

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080104D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Commander, RD: AUTHOR

Abstract

The circuit shown uses the characteristics of an integrated circuit operational amplifier to provide a transducer amplifier, which can accept input pulses over a wide dynamic range with accurate discrimination against spurious signals below a predetermined detection threshold.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 80% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Wide Dynamic Range Transducer Amplifier

The circuit shown uses the characteristics of an integrated circuit operational amplifier to provide a transducer amplifier, which can accept input pulses over a wide dynamic range with accurate discrimination against spurious signals below a predetermined detection threshold.

Resistors R1 and R2 operate as a potential divider, arranged to reduce the largest expected signal to a level below that which would take the operational amplifier out of its linear range. C1 and R3 are arranged to have a time constant comparable with the input repetition rate of the transducer, so as to provide a detection threshold of about half the peak input. C1 is charged through a feedback diode D1 connected to the output of the operational amplifier.

With this arrangement the positive portion of the input signal has no effect, since the amplifier is already being driven hard in the same direction by the charge on C1, resulting from the previous pulse. The negative part of the signal will, when greater in magnitude than the voltage across C1 as seen at the amplifier input, cause the amplifier output to go negative. The inverting input of the amplifier will be pulled negative through D1, and C1 is charged quickly in a negative direction through resistor R4.

It should be noted that C1 charging current is proportional to the input pulse amplitude which appears across R4 so that C1 always charges to a given proportion of the input voltage, independe...