Browse Prior Art Database

Measuring Mechanical Motion for Diagnostic Purposes in a Concurrent Maintenance Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080139D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boucher, RK: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In large electromechanical input-output (peripheral) devices, it is advantageous to evaluate mechanical performance such as motor acceleration, deceleration and velocity by program analysis. This analysis is required to verify that the device is functioning correctly, or to assist in problem determination, adjustment and repair. In previous methods, it has been necessary to dedicate the CPU to measuring time between events or series of events. With the present method of electromechanical evaluation, the measurement or series of measurements are made and collected at the peripheral device. This eliminates the requirement of a dedicated system.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Measuring Mechanical Motion for Diagnostic Purposes in a Concurrent Maintenance Environment

In large electromechanical input-output (peripheral) devices, it is advantageous to evaluate mechanical performance such as motor acceleration, deceleration and velocity by program analysis.

This analysis is required to verify that the device is functioning correctly, or to assist in problem determination, adjustment and repair. In previous methods, it has been necessary to dedicate the CPU to measuring time between events or series of events. With the present method of electromechanical evaluation, the measurement or series of measurements are made and collected at the peripheral device. This eliminates the requirement of a dedicated system.

This is accomplished by utilizing conventional electromechanical transducer devices, control circuitry and storage capacity in conjunction with additional diagnostic circuitry. This allows the device to require only a command chain from the CPU to perform a desired mechanical operation, collect and store the measurement data, until CPU retrieval of this data is convenient to the system. This eliminates system time dependencies and system dedication.

The drawing is a diagrammatic illustration of how this system is organized. A central-processing unit 3, or CPU, has associated therewith a plurality of peripheral units designated P1, P2 and P3. These units may be of a variety of types, such as card readers, character recognition machines, printers, or other well known input-output devices. Each of the peripheral units is operatively connected to the CPU...