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Reclaiming Potassium Gold Cyanide from Rinse Water using a Reverse Osmosis Unit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080217D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ameen, TJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Reverse osmosis systems using cellulose acetate semipermeable membranes cannot recover potassium gold cyanide from a bath operating at a normal pH of about 4.2, because hydrogen protons are picked up from the water and form hydrogen gold cyanide which cannot be rejected by the membrane.

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Reclaiming Potassium Gold Cyanide from Rinse Water using a Reverse Osmosis Unit

Reverse osmosis systems using cellulose acetate semipermeable membranes cannot recover potassium gold cyanide from a bath operating at a normal pH of about 4.2, because hydrogen protons are picked up from the water and form hydrogen gold cyanide which cannot be rejected by the membrane.

By diverting a portion of the gold contaminated rinse water and raising its pH to a value considerably above that corresponding to neutralization of the hydrogen proton, acceptable rejection rates for gold cyanide have been achieved with a reverse osmosis unit. Rejection rates will be maximized by using reverse osmosis units that operate at high pressures. The concentrate thus obtained contains all the constituents of a gold bath. Since it was extracted from DI water, it has high purity and it suitable for recycling back into the bath after readjustment of its pH value.

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