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Treatment of Powders

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080303D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Detweiler, JR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method has two primary applications, removing dust, light debris, and particle contamination from a powder, and controlling the fine end of a subsieve size powder particle distribution. The method comprises passing a gas 10 through an agitated powder 12 in a vertical column 14, thus removing any material which has a size-density product less than the powder itself. The vertical column 14 comprises a vibrator section 16, a manifold 18, a filter 20, and a flexible bellows portion depicted at 22.

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Treatment of Powders

This method has two primary applications, removing dust, light debris, and particle contamination from a powder, and controlling the fine end of a subsieve size powder particle distribution. The method comprises passing a gas 10 through an agitated powder 12 in a vertical column 14, thus removing any material which has a size-density product less than the powder itself. The vertical column 14 comprises a vibrator section 16, a manifold 18, a filter 20, and a flexible bellows portion depicted at 22.

The method can be equally applied to remove smaller particles of the powder itself. By controlling the velocity of the gas flow, only particles of certain size and density will be carried out of the column in accordance with Stoke's law, as shown by the arrows 24 in Fig. 1. The method has successfully been utilized to remove fine alumina particle contamination from glass powder dry milled in alumina ball mill jars. It has also been utilized to alter the distribution of a subsieve size powder, as indicated in the curves of Figs. 2 and 3.

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