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Optical Detector Array for High Speed Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080347D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lorenz, MR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A low-cost, high-speed detector array is described which permits printing or copying to occur simultaneously with a scanning operation.

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Optical Detector Array for High Speed Printing

A low-cost, high-speed detector array is described which permits printing or copying to occur simultaneously with a scanning operation.

The technique utilizes the anisotropic thermoelectric voltage produced by a light pulse incident on either a thin film having anisotropic characteristics, due to grain growth, or on a highly strained thin film deposited on any one of a number of possible inexpensive substrate materials such as PYREX* or glass. The fact that such films produce transverse voltages for a pulsed temperature gradient normal to the film makes it possible to fabricate a large array, for the purpose of signaling an individual ink jet by a pulsed voltage as a scanning light beam impinges on a region of sensitivity.

This voltage signal causes the ink jet to write or not write depending on the particular coding being used.

A scheme for making hard copies from either a negative in transmission or a positive in reflection is shown in the figure. In each case, the scanning laser light passes over the information to be copied which, in turn, is disposed over a sensing bar 11. The laser beam sensitizes spots on bar 11 causing, in the transmission mode, an output potential on leads 1-10 which is proportional to the transparency, or inversely proportional to the opacity of the material being copied. This potential, in turn, activates ink jets (not shown) reproducing the scanned material or information. Similar outputs...