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Timing and Control Generation using an Associative Array

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080360D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Noscowicz, EJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Complex timing and control logic functions can be accomplished using an associative array. By use of an associative array of monolithic array oxide silicon (MAOS) devices, the timing and control is electronically alterable and nonvolatile resulting in hardware count reduction.

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Timing and Control Generation using an Associative Array

Complex timing and control logic functions can be accomplished using an associative array. By use of an associative array of monolithic array oxide silicon (MAOS) devices, the timing and control is electronically alterable and nonvolatile resulting in hardware count reduction.

Referring to Fig. 1, the array consists of M array words with each word containing K bits. Each bit of each word consists of an associative cell, and each bit of every word is addressed by one and the same position of a shift register of length K. That is, shift register position N addresses bit N of words 1 through M. The associative cell performs a compare function and it is programmable. Its truth table is shown in Fig. 2, where phi is denoted as a `Don't Care' state. It can be seen that the cell output is a 1 if the cell state and the input match or if the cell is in a Don't Care state. The output is 0 for a mismatch. In any array structure, K associative cells are interconnected with a single output for the entire word. The word output is a 1 if all word cells are a 1 and a 0 if one or more cells are in a 0 (mismatch) state.

Consider one word of an array which is programmed as diagrammed and shown in Fig. 3 and the associated addressing shift register. The shift register is loaded with 0's except for position 1. When the register shifts to the right, a 0 will be entered into position 1 such that a solitary 1 will propagate throug...