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Surface Preparation for III V Compounds

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080420D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hovel, HJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Surface preparation is one of the most important steps in the fabrication of devices. Unwanted impurities left on the surface of a sample prior to diffusion or epitaxial growth can become incorporated into the device during the diffusion or epitaxy, and act as compensators or recombination centers. Surface preparation also has large effects on the Surface morphology and general crystal perfection of epitaxial layers; stacking faults, growth hillocks, even regions of polycrystallinity can often be traced to inadequate surface preparation.

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Surface Preparation for III V Compounds

Surface preparation is one of the most important steps in the fabrication of devices. Unwanted impurities left on the surface of a sample prior to diffusion or epitaxial growth can become incorporated into the device during the diffusion or epitaxy, and act as compensators or recombination centers. Surface preparation also has large effects on the Surface morphology and general crystal perfection of epitaxial layers; stacking faults, growth hillocks, even regions of polycrystallinity can often be traced to inadequate surface preparation.

There are, of course, myriad ways in which samples can be prepared. One of the most common is to clean a sample in organic solvents, etch the surface, rinse it with deionized water, and either allow the sample to dry in air or blow-off the H(2)O with a stream of gas. This exposure to H(2)O and O(2) however, often leads to growth of unwanted oxides on the surface with consequent epitaxial growth difficulties. An alternative has been to boil a sample in alcohol (methanol), allowing the solvent to evaporate from the surface so that it will not be exposed to H(2)O. Unfortunately, the heat of condensation is so high that the evaporation cools the sample to the point where H(2)O condenses on it from the air.

The present method consists of a specific technique for preparing surfaces of III-V compounds that results in unusually pure surfaces. The steps include the etching of a wafer in any of the c...