Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Terminal Computer Communication Security System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080463D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nielsen, GF: AUTHOR

Abstract

Security is enhanced for controlling access between an intelligent or microprogrammed remote terminal and a central processing unit, by requiring entry of operator passwords and terminal appended data, which must correlate with access authorizing data present in the central station. In the past, passwords supposedly known only to the user are entered at the remote terminal and used for various functions such as to identify the user, the user's program and data, access to other programs and data, and for billing purposes. The system shown uses such password entry but also appends information unique to the entry terminal, Which is correlated at the central station to provide an additional level of user access security.

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Remote Terminal Computer Communication Security System

Security is enhanced for controlling access between an intelligent or microprogrammed remote terminal and a central processing unit, by requiring entry of operator passwords and terminal appended data, which must correlate with access authorizing data present in the central station. In the past, passwords supposedly known only to the user are entered at the remote terminal and used for various functions such as to identify the user, the user's program and data, access to other programs and data, and for billing purposes. The system shown uses such password entry but also appends information unique to the entry terminal, Which is correlated at the central station to provide an additional level of user access security.

The block diagram shows an intelligent microprogram terminal which is, along with other terminals, connected to a central processing unit CPU through communication facilities such as communication adapter 23 and modem 24. The processor shown, uses a program controlled input bus 29 and output bus 30 coupled to one or more input/output devices such as keyboard, printer, etc., all of which are subservient to the processor shown.

Units of data such as addresses are accessed from either read/write control storage 14 or read-only store (ROS) control storage 15 by a mricroinstruction. Such units of data are then placed on bus out 30 and sent to a specified device attached by appropriate interface logic to 30. Conversely, units of data are fetched from a particular device over 29 and stored in 14 by a microinstruction. The number of units of data exchanged is a function of the control microprogram contained in the control store 15, although 15 can be ROS or read/write store. ROS module 10 is preferably an integrated circuit and connects to 29 and 30 via interface and powering circuitry, and then to storage data register 13.

Module 15 forms an input device, addressable by the CPU, and can be controlled to place on 29 the contents of specifically addressed locations within the module. The identification ROS module 10 typically can retain a wide variety of identification data combinations in ROS 12 such as machine type, serial numbers, specific customer numbers, random numbers assigned from a master list and the like. With such a microprogram controlled input device as 10 in the terminal, the following is a typical sequence of communication operation.

After communications are established through 24 such as through dial-up...