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Liquid Metal Alloy Contacts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080506D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marinace, JC: AUTHOR

Abstract

The figure shows a sideview of a gallium arsenide laser to which copper contacts are applied, by means of an alloy disposed between the surface of the laser and an adjacent copper conductor. The alloy utilized is a gallium-indium alloy which has a vapor pressure orders of magnitude lower than mercury-indium alloys which have been previously proposed. Also, gallium-indium alloys wet many metals and semiconductors with relative ease, yet it does not dissolve an appreciable amount of the metals or semiconductors.

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Liquid Metal Alloy Contacts

The figure shows a sideview of a gallium arsenide laser to which copper contacts are applied, by means of an alloy disposed between the surface of the laser and an adjacent copper conductor. The alloy utilized is a gallium-indium alloy which has a vapor pressure orders of magnitude lower than mercury-indium alloys which have been previously proposed. Also, gallium-indium alloys wet many metals and semiconductors with relative ease, yet it does not dissolve an appreciable amount of the metals or semiconductors.

Two different gallium-indium alloys may be utilized. In one instance, an alloy of approx. 75% Ga - ~ 25% In was used. In another instance, an alloy consisting of 75% Ga - 25% In with approx. 10% tin added was utilized. Another useful alloy is 62.5% Ga - 21.5% In - 16% Sn which has a melting point of 10.7 degrees C. The area of wetting on copper can be defined by first electroplating In in a desired pattern on the copper.

These contacts provide good electrical and thermal contact to electrical devices with minimum mechanical stress.

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