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Large Area Diodes and Technique for Producing and Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080529D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barson, F: AUTHOR

Abstract

It has been observed that leakage or low-breakdown voltage in diodes usually occurs at discrete spots in the diode, rather than being uniformly high over the entire diode area. Thus, it follows that if the localized defective regions can be healed, the diodes will be of better quality and yield can be increased. Since in diodes the defects occur in a random fashion, the larger the diode the greater the probability that it will include a defect.

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Large Area Diodes and Technique for Producing and Testing

It has been observed that leakage or low-breakdown voltage in diodes usually occurs at discrete spots in the diode, rather than being uniformly high over the entire diode area. Thus, it follows that if the localized defective regions can be healed, the diodes will be of better quality and yield can be increased. Since in diodes the defects occur in a random fashion, the larger the diode the greater the probability that it will include a defect.

In this concept, in fabricating the diode having a large area, it is proposed that the area be broken up into a number of smaller areas and arranged in parallel as shown in Fig. 1. Body 10 contains therein a plurality of diffused regions 12, each provided with an aluminum contact 14. A layer of dielectric material 16, typically SiO(2),is provided as a passivating layer. The structure shown in Fig. 1 is fabricated using conventional semiconductor processing techniques.

The device is anodized using the apparatus illustrated in Fig. 2 by contacting the wafer 20, normally containing a plurality of diode devices, by immersing it in a suitable electrolyte 22 such as a dilute H(2)SO(4) solution. As indicated in Fig. 2, the wafer 20 is made the anode in the solution by providing a cathode element 24 and a current source 26. Current will flow only in those diodes which have significant leakage at the applied bias. The reverse-biased junctions prevent current flow in the nonl...