Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Paging System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080530D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Croisier, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

In this paging system, persons who may be called carry radio receivers which act essentially as transponders, whereby the called person need not identify himself to the system. Sufficient identification is possible by the mere fact that the system receives back, via a telephone used by the called person, a coded signal which the system is transmitting uniquely to that particular receiver.

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Automatic Paging System

In this paging system, persons who may be called carry radio receivers which act essentially as transponders, whereby the called person need not identify himself to the system. Sufficient identification is possible by the mere fact that the system receives back, via a telephone used by the called person, a coded signal which the system is transmitting uniquely to that particular receiver.

A call for a particular party having a receiver R(X) is initiated by the calling party at telephone set A. The calling party first takes the handset off the hook at set A and then dials a call prefix, followed by the identification number X of the party whom he wishes to call. The prefix dialed causes the switch network 1 to transmit the information to the system controller 2,which in turn causes transmitter 3 to broadcast the identification code of X to receiver R(X). This transmission may be on a frequency which is unique to R(X), and may be time division multiplexed with other transmissions to other receivers, not shown.

The signals corresponding to the identification number information of the called party X holding his receiver R(X) are thereupon emitted by the speaker of that receiver, as a repetitive sequence of audible signals.

The called party thereupon goes to any conveniently located telephone B having access to the system, lifts its handset and dials a response code. He then holds his receiver R(X) in such fashion that the handset of telephone...