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Thermal Stabilization of CrO(2) in Organic Binders

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080541D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chang, PT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Chromium dioxide reacts with organic binders at elevated temperatures in excess of 300 Degrees F, yielding a material with magnetic properties that are inferior to the original material. Stannous octoate stabilizes the chromium dioxide and yields a material having about 10% greater remanence than the untreated material.

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Thermal Stabilization of CrO(2) in Organic Binders

Chromium dioxide reacts with organic binders at elevated temperatures in excess of 300 Degrees F, yielding a material with magnetic properties that are inferior to the original material. Stannous octoate stabilizes the chromium dioxide and yields a material having about 10% greater remanence than the untreated material.

Chromium dioxide dispersed in a polyester and coreacted with a phenol blocked isocyanate and catalized with stannous octoate yields a system that, when cured at 300 Degrees F for approximately six hours, followed by a short time heat treatment at 450 Degrees F, has superior magnetic properties compared to samples heat treated at 300 Degrees F. The magnetic properties are increased by approximately 10%.

A specific formulation utilizes a mill base of between 1000-2000 grams chromium dioxide, 400-500 grams polyester, and a CELLOSILVE*/ isophorone solvent of approximately 1700-2000 grams. The mill base is let down with the phenol blocked isocyanate of an amount of approximately 700-500 grams, in substantially 1000-ml of CELLOSILVE*/isophorone.

The above formulation is mixed to substantially 70 cps viscosity. The stannous octoate is then added at a rate to yield approximately 1% of the total weight. The final material is cured for substantially six hours at 300 Degrees F, at which point it is still slightly soluble in methyl ethyl ketone, followed by, for example, a 1 1/2 minute cure at 450 Degrees F,...