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Evaporating Reactive Organic Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080546D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Keller, GS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Although conventional techniques are readily available for the preparation of thin-metal films by evaporation in vacuo, the vacuum deposition of organic compounds may demand a modification appropriate to the individual compound. Such a situation obtains with certain reactive organic dyes.

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Evaporating Reactive Organic Materials

Although conventional techniques are readily available for the preparation of thin-metal films by evaporation in vacuo, the vacuum deposition of organic compounds may demand a modification appropriate to the individual compound. Such a situation obtains with certain reactive organic dyes.

Attempts to evaporate these dyes from conventional metallizing equipment such as metal boats, metal crucibles, metal baskets etc., resulted in decomposition of the material and loss in photosensitivity. Use of quartz crucibles was also unsuccessful. Sublimation was possible in a conventional all-glass subliming apparatus; however, control of deposit thickness is difficult in such a system. A thermogravimetric study showed that success in evaporation would then be dependent on the rate of heating, the absolute pressure, and the degree of thermal contact with the heating elements.

Thus a unique design for a source heater must be considered. In this arrangement, the dye, prepared as a micronized dispersion in heptane, is slurried onto a PYREX* plate (4" x 4" x 1/8". Evaporation of the solvent leaves a uniform, thin layer of material (Approximately 4 mils). Heating of the glass plate is by radiation from a series of NICHROME** heating coils (typically operated at 35 VAC) enclosed in a metal box; the glass plate is cut to fit as a top for the enclosure. Thus all contact with hot metal is avoided and large area (4" x 4" deposition, uniform in nat...