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Browse Prior Art Database

Single Jet Drum Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080557D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Demer, FM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This printer relates to a low cost and quiet means for the production of a hard-copy message at points remote from the transmitter.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
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Single Jet Drum Printer

This printer relates to a low cost and quiet means for the production of a hard-copy message at points remote from the transmitter.

Message Capacity. The message is produced in matrix form on a strip with a capacity of 360 characters--6 lines of 60-character locations each. The characters consist of selectively ejected ink dots at the element locations of a 5x7 matrix for each character. Jet control is provided by conventional electronic storage of character "codes" successively directed to a "character generator". The controls are timed by pulses generated in synchronism with the relative motion of the jet and the paper strip.

Paper Motion. The paper strip (1.5"x7") is carried on the surface of a rotating drum (400 RPM). The ink jet assembly is held by a carriage so as to be 0.020" from the paper surface. The jet carriage is moved by a lead screw driven (200 RPM) by the rotating paper drum. Drum rotation produces a relative motion between the jet and paper along the "print line" The lead screw produces a transverse relative motion between the jet and "print line".

Matrix element location. Seven rotations of the drum are required to produce the row locations for each line of characters. Each of these rows is shifted transversely by the rotation of the carriage lead screw by 0.016" from the preceding row. Potential ink dot locations along each row are picked out by transducer pulses, generated by a slotted soft-iron ring mounted integrally with the drum. A pulse is produced for each 0.016" of relative motion along the "print line". Intercharacter line spacing is produced by idle drum revolutions, and intercharacter spacing by making each 6th pulse nonoperative. Drum rotation is continuous throughout message transmission.

Paper Storage and Operation. Paper is supplied to the pri...