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Gas Discharge Display with High Resolution and Memory

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080578D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Criscimagna, AN: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The gas discharge display arrangement shown in Fig. 1, permits the simplicity in driving circuits and ease of addressing characteristic of the scan" or "shift" type gas discharge displays, and yet exhibits thee high-resolution characteristic of the AC type gas discharge display with its internal charge-storage "memory" feature. The operation of the device depends upon two known characteristics of the gas. The first characteristic is that ignited gas, itself, has a "memory". The second characteristic is that ignited points or regions of gas may be positioned at selected locations or addresses, using a drift field. The "memory" characteristic is based upon the concept of using the lifetime of the ions and metastable atoms of the ignited gas for storage.

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Gas Discharge Display with High Resolution and Memory

The gas discharge display arrangement shown in Fig. 1, permits the simplicity in driving circuits and ease of addressing characteristic of the scan" or "shift" type gas discharge displays, and yet exhibits thee high-resolution characteristic of the AC type gas discharge display with its internal charge- storage "memory" feature. The operation of the device depends upon two known characteristics of the gas. The first characteristic is that ignited gas, itself, has a "memory". The second characteristic is that ignited points or regions of gas may be positioned at selected locations or addresses, using a drift field. The "memory" characteristic is based upon the concept of using the lifetime of the ions and metastable atoms of the ignited gas for storage.

It is known that when a discharge has been struck between two electrodes, and then turned off, there remains for some minimum time a non-equilibrium state in the vicinity of the previous discharge. Both ions and metastable gas atoms are present in this vicinity. Accordingly, subsequent timely application of a voltage to the electrodes in this vicinity will be aided by the existence of these species, so that a lower voltage than the original gaseous breakdown voltage may be employed to reignite the gas in this vicinity.

As shown in the exploded view in Fig. 1, the basic embodiment comprises a pair of insulating substrates 1 and 3 upon which has been deposited area sustain electrodes 5 and 7, respectively. The insulating substrates 1 and 3 may comprise any of a variety of materials, so long as at least one of the substrates is transparent. Typically, substrates 1 and 3 may comprise conventional soda lime glass, in plate form.

The conductive material used to fabricate area electrodes 5 and 7 may be deposited upon substrates 1 and 3 by any of a variety of conventional deposition techniques, which act to create a layer of conductive material of relatively uniform thickness. As is evident, at least one of the area electrodes should be transparent, or at least partially transparent.

As shown,at the left side of each of substrates 1 and 3, writing electrodes a-g and h, respectively, have been provided. Writing electrodes a-g extend through substrate 1, from one surface to the other. Each of the individual writing electrodes a-g is isolated from the other and from area electrode 5. Elongated writing electrode h, deposited upon substrate 3, is, likewise, isolated from area electrode 7. Writing electrode h may typically be grounded, while writing electrodes a-g are individually connected to information source 8.

Dielectric layer 9 acts to cover the ends of each of the writing electrode a-g and area electrode 5, while dielectric layer 11 acts to cover writing electrode h and area electrode 7. As is understood by those skilled in the art, dielectric layers 9 and 11 may comprise any of a variety of dielectric materials. Typically, where substr...