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Slope Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080612D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Penny, RE: AUTHOR

Abstract

The figure illustrates a voltage slope detector for input voltage signals, which detects the slope without the usual differentiation circuit. Using a differentiator and comparing the output of it to zero volts to determine whether the slope of the input is positive or negative, has a disadvantage that the differentiator output amplitude is dependent on input slope. This condition will cause saturation of the differentiating amplifier if the slope is too great, and at that point the circuit is no longer accurate. The circuit presented overcomes the problem.

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Slope Detector

The figure illustrates a voltage slope detector for input voltage signals, which detects the slope without the usual differentiation circuit. Using a differentiator and comparing the output of it to zero volts to determine whether the slope of the input is positive or negative, has a disadvantage that the differentiator output amplitude is dependent on input slope. This condition will cause saturation of the differentiating amplifier if the slope is too great, and at that point the circuit is no longer accurate. The circuit presented overcomes the problem.

Operational amplifier 1 has an output amplitude which is dependent only on the input signal amplitude. For positive slope of VIN, diode D2 is forward biased and causes capacitor C1 to charge. For a negative input slope of VIN, diode D1 is forward biased and the voltage on C1 will follow the input signal. The comparator 2 is connected to sense the direction of bias across diodes D1 and D2, and give a digital plus or minus output corresponding to the slope of the input signal VIN. The circuit is operable over a wide frequency range, which is controlled primarily by the frequency response of the operational amplifier 1 and the RC constant of the diode and capacitor portions of the network.

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