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Removing Metallic Films from Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080618D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chen, YT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Continuous metallic films are coated on rigid nonmetallic substrates by many techniques. Included among these coating techniques are electroplating, electroless plating, vacuum deposition, sputtering and gas plating. Subsequent removal of such metallic films from a rigid substrate, for salvage or testing purposes for example, is sometimes desired. Separation of the metallic film from the rigid substrate is obtained easily and efficiently, by subjecting the film to extremes in temperature.

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Removing Metallic Films from Substrates

Continuous metallic films are coated on rigid nonmetallic substrates by many techniques. Included among these coating techniques are electroplating, electroless plating, vacuum deposition, sputtering and gas plating. Subsequent removal of such metallic films from a rigid substrate, for salvage or testing purposes for example, is sometimes desired. Separation of the metallic film from the rigid substrate is obtained easily and efficiently, by subjecting the film to extremes in temperature.

Initially the coating is subjected to corrosive material, such as hydrogen fluoride vapor, for a time sufficient to provide some erosion between an edge of the film and the substrate. The article is then immersed in water, allowing some water to penetrate between the film and substrate. Then while still wet, the coated article is reduced to an extremely low temperature, for example by immersion in liquid nitrogen. The low temperature causes the water between the metal film and substrate to freeze, thus expanding and initiating separation between the film and the substrate.

Subsequent warming of the article, such as by heating, immersion in a hot liquid, or allowing it to return to ambient temperature allows the metal film to completely separate from the substrate. These techniques are especially useful for removal of metal films from rigid substrates such as glass, quartz, silicon, and ceramics.

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