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Photolithographic Process Using a Disposable Nonmetallic Mask

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080634D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Desai, KS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This photolithographic process is suitable for the manufacture of single and multilayer ceramic interconnection packages (Fig. 1). By employing this method for depositing a high-resolution metallized pattern 10 on a green ceramic substrate 11, up to 1.5 mil lines to 1.5 mil spacings can be achieved, thus allowing for significantly greater line definition and attendant closer spacing between the metallized lines than was previously possible.

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Photolithographic Process Using a Disposable Nonmetallic Mask

This photolithographic process is suitable for the manufacture of single and multilayer ceramic interconnection packages (Fig. 1). By employing this method for depositing a high-resolution metallized pattern 10 on a green ceramic substrate 11, up to 1.5 mil lines to 1.5 mil spacings can be achieved, thus allowing for significantly greater line definition and attendant closer spacing between the metallized lines than was previously possible.

Fig. 2 illustrates the sequence of steps employed to form the masked pattern on a thick-film photopolymer resist material, which is then employed to deposit the metallized patter on the ceramic green sheet material.

Step 1: A photomask, e.g., chrome or an emulsion 12 on a glass layer 13, is positioned over a plurality of laminated layers, such as an upper transparent polyethylene film 14, an intermediate thick-film photopolymer resist layer 15, for example, RISTON*, and an underlying polyethylene terephthalate polyester layer 16, for example, MYLAR*. The photomask is exposed with a suitable light source 17 for exposing layer 15 through transparent layer 14. Areas 18 and 19, defining a latent interconnection pattern, remain unexposed.

Step 2: The polyethylene layer 14 is peeled off.

Step 3: By chemical development techniques, latent interconnection pattern layer 15 is developed in areas 18 and 19 so as to form apertures 20 and 21.

Step 4: The thick-film photopolymer...