Browse Prior Art Database

Setter Plate Surface Improvement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080684D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McCarthy, D: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In a gas panel fabrication, a panel consisting of two glass substrates with metallic conductors dispersed orthogonally thereon require several heating cycles in a furnace. Setter plates are used to hold the gas panel assembly during the dielectric reflow cycle, which insulates the conductor arrays from contact with the gas, and a sealing cycle to seal the two substrates together. However, microscopic porosity on the surface of the setter plate will impart a corresponding rough finish to the glass substrates held thereon, when the temperature rises above the softening point of the glass substrates with a resultant degradation in the appearance of the panel. A solution to this problem is provided as follows.

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Setter Plate Surface Improvement

In a gas panel fabrication, a panel consisting of two glass substrates with metallic conductors dispersed orthogonally thereon require several heating cycles in a furnace. Setter plates are used to hold the gas panel assembly during the dielectric reflow cycle, which insulates the conductor arrays from contact with the gas, and a sealing cycle to seal the two substrates together. However, microscopic porosity on the surface of the setter plate will impart a corresponding rough finish to the glass substrates held thereon, when the temperature rises above the softening point of the glass substrates with a resultant degradation in the appearance of the panel. A solution to this problem is provided as follows.

Referring to Fig. 1, a setter plate 1 has an irregular upper surface 3, shown as exaggerated for ease of description. If the holes and porosity of the setter plate surface are relatively large as in Fig. 1, this problem may obviously be corrected by grinding and polishing the surface. However, continued use of this procedure will ultimately cause the setter plate 1 to wear out.

An alternative solution to this problem is to apply a layer 5 of a high- temperature glass having similar thermal expansion characteristics over the surface of the setter plate 1, to fill in the holes and pores. This upper glass layer 5 may be applied by conventional glass reflow techniques. The newly reflown surface is then ground smooth and polished, as...