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Silane Extraction and Passivation of Iron and Iron Cobalt Alloy Particles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080695D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Atkin, RB: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Iron or iron-cobalt alloy particles with dimensions between approximately 100 and 1,000 angstroms are dispersed in mercury after electro-deposition, by known processes for forming such particles in a mercury bath. The particles are separated from the dispersion by the addition of a silane coupling agent, such as gamma-(beta aminoethyl) aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, H(2)NCH(2) CH(2)NK (CH(2))(3) Si (OCH(3))(3).

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Silane Extraction and Passivation of Iron and Iron Cobalt Alloy Particles

Iron or iron-cobalt alloy particles with dimensions between approximately 100 and 1,000 angstroms are dispersed in mercury after electro-deposition, by known processes for forming such particles in a mercury bath. The particles are separated from the dispersion by the addition of a silane coupling agent, such as gamma-(beta aminoethyl) aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, H(2)NCH(2) CH(2)NK (CH(2))(3) Si (OCH(3))(3).

After addition of the silane coupling agent, agitation occurs, and the liquid silane phase with the dispersed magnetic particles and the mercury phase are separated by decanting the silane solution. Next, the magnetic particles coated with the silane coupling agent are separated from the excess liquid silane by vacuum distillation. The silane coated particles are now ready for use, as for example, in magnetic tape or magnetic disk coating processes.

The time involved is only a few hours for the separation to occur utilizing the silane coupling agent. The agent further prevents magnetic particle agglomeration. Further, the particles made by this technique are not pyrophoric, where particles made by the usual methods are pyrophoric. There is additionally an improved corrosion resistance inherent in these particles.

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