Browse Prior Art Database

Fast Block Information Access

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080734D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vajda, AM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a storage system having fast block information access. In general, if a memory is organized into main and auxiliary memories and the main memory is broken into blocks, then within each block defect bands can be defined, and the nature of these defects and the information about appropriate replacement can be stored in a separate status memory. If the memory is good, the signal proceeds to obtain the information in the normal manner. If not, an alternate address is generated by the status memory and the information is obtained from the auxiliary memory.

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Fast Block Information Access

Described is a storage system having fast block information access. In general, if a memory is organized into main and auxiliary memories and the main memory is broken into blocks, then within each block defect bands can be defined, and the nature of these defects and the information about appropriate replacement can be stored in a separate status memory. If the memory is good, the signal proceeds to obtain the information in the normal manner. If not, an alternate address is generated by the status memory and the information is obtained from the auxiliary memory.

To properly utilize this idea a basic system module is divided into a main memory and an auxiliary memory, in which the main memory comprises the size of the desired Basic System Module (BSM) and which contains some defects. The auxiliary memory associated with the main memory is of sufficient character capacity, to act as a replacement for defective addresses in the main memory. The main memory is further divided into blocks which can be any undefined length of address dimension and any undefined bit dimension, and these blocks can be superimposed on the organization of the physical memory in any way desired.

Preferably the blocks are superimposed on a memory system in such a manner that the defects will tend to cluster in the block. These defects are expressed by establishing and storing the last good address before the first defect, and the number of addresses falling into the defective grouping. This way all the addresses between first and last defect in the block can be discarded and define the defect bands. Once the defect bands are defined, they can be recorded and the information stored in a director or other address scheme.

The auxiliary memory is also divided according to the needed number of replacement addresses for each block. Thus each block is assigned a starting address in the auxiliary memory for its band of defects. Now when an incoming address signal is received by the BSM, it is routed first to a status memory...