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Powered Roll Stacker

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080736D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 151K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wayson, AR: AUTHOR

Abstract

This powered roll stacker can be used to achieve uniform stacking of letter mail at relatively high rates, for example up to 20 letters per second, and provides good control of the shape of the mail stack during the unloading of the stacker by a drop sweeping technique.

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Powered Roll Stacker

This powered roll stacker can be used to achieve uniform stacking of letter mail at relatively high rates, for example up to 20 letters per second, and provides good control of the shape of the mail stack during the unloading of the stacker by a drop sweeping technique.

Fig. 1 is illustrative of the general mechanical arrangement of the stacker. Letters are stacked in the short direction from an edge feed transport, via the stacker rolls 3 and 5. Roll 3 is driven at a suitable speed with a direction of rotation as shown by the arrow, and roll 5 is an idler roll pressed against roll 3 by a suitable tensioning means,not shown. The receiving face of the stacker comprises a plurality of rods or wires 7 bent to the shapes shown, so that letters which are fed downwardly between rolls 3 and 5 strike the rods 7, and are guided to a position wherein they rest on the bottom of the stacker. The bottom of the stacker is composed of a plurality of wires 9 suitably fastened to a guide 11, which is held at one end for a sliding movement between rails 13 and 15, a roller 17 providing suitable antifriction engagement.

The stacker bottom 9 is reciprocated in the direction shown by the arrow by suitable motor means, not shown, but which is coupled to the stacker bottom 9 via the cable 19. Return spring 21 provides a force to restore the stacker bottom to its normal position, as shown.

A limit switch 23 detects the stacker bottom 9 in its normal or closed position.

A stacker follower is provided comprising a plurality of suitably shaped wires or rods 25 arranged for reciprocating motion, in the manner shown. A suitable limit switch 27 detects when the stacker follower has been pushed to its limiting distance to the left, indicating a stacker pocket which has been filled with letters.

At the bottom of the angle stacker face, there is provided a powered set of stacking rolls 29 which rotate continuously in the direction shown by the arrow, that is in the same direction as the feed rolls, and at substantially the same velocity. These rolls may be of a composition similar to the stacker feed rolls 3, 5 with a coefficient of friction against paper exceeding 0.5, for example.

Positioned below the stackers are a plurality of sweep transport buckets 31, into which the letters which have been stacked are emptied by retracting the floor 9 of the stacker. These sweep transport buckets are moved by a transport means including the belt 33, and other mechanism,not shown, to move the buckets in the direction shown by the arrow.

Fig. 2 shows the sequence of events during stacking. In Fig. 2A, a letter is just entering the stacker. T...