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Pointer Validation and Evaluation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080742D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Larson, LE: AUTHOR

Abstract

This process employs a combination of a memory structure and a computer process, to determine that a pointer is valid and provide the storage address of the beginning of the address space.

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Pointer Validation and Evaluation

This process employs a combination of a memory structure and a computer process, to determine that a pointer is valid and provide the storage address of the beginning of the address space.

The pointers are divided into two parts, an index and a sequence number. A table is also constructed which is an Nx3 array, where N is the maximum number of valid pointers existing (or have existed) to date. A row of the table has the form of an index, a sequence number, and the address of the object which the pointer represents. Four functions are used in the operation of this process; INITIALIZE, GENERATE, DESTROY, and LOCATE (See the figure). INITIALIZE - This function creates a table with shape, but no

entries.

GENERATE - This function creates and returns a pointer.

DESTROY - This function destroys the relationship of the

pointer and the storage address. Any further

reference to the pointer is invalid.

LOCATE - This function extracts from the table the address

associated with the pointer.

Essential elements are:

1) Pointers which serve as a label for storage elements,

and which can be decomposed into two parts, an index

and a sequence;

2) A table which stores the relationship of the pointer

and the storage address;,

3) The processes required to generate and destroy pointers

in a fashion, to allow a very low probability of pointer

duplication; and

4) The process required to transform the pointer into a

storage address.

The pointer could be c...