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Soldered Lines on Metallized Ceramic Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080765D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wilson, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The following process is useful for tinning lines on metallized substrates: 1) Evaporate chrome/copper metallurgy over the surface of the substrate. 2) Apply photoresist, expose, develop, and etch the personality into the metallurgy. 3) With the exposed copper lines, tin them using 10 lead/90 tin solder. 4) Spray thermosetting plastic over the substrates and cure. 5) Apply photoresist, expose, develop and rinse to form semiconductor chip sites. 6) post bake photoresist. 7) Remove exposed thermosetting plastic using a suitable etchant. 8) The process used in removal of the exposed solder is to use a commercial solder stripper, followed by a 15 second dip in FeCl(3) to remove the gray film left by the stripper. 9) Remove the remaining photoresist by placing them in a commercial photoresist stripper.

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Soldered Lines on Metallized Ceramic Substrates

The following process is useful for tinning lines on metallized substrates: 1) Evaporate chrome/copper metallurgy over the surface of the substrate. 2) Apply photoresist, expose, develop, and etch the personality into the metallurgy. 3) With the exposed copper lines, tin them using 10 lead/90 tin solder. 4) Spray thermosetting plastic over the substrates and cure. 5) Apply photoresist, expose, develop and rinse to form semiconductor chip sites. 6) post bake photoresist. 7) Remove exposed thermosetting plastic using a suitable etchant. 8) The process used in removal of the exposed solder is to use a commercial solder stripper, followed by a 15 second dip in FeCl(3) to remove the gray film left by the stripper.
9) Remove the remaining photoresist by placing them in a commercial photoresist stripper. 10) The parts are then ready for the module operations.

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