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Browse Prior Art Database

Charge Coupled Devices Optical Sensor Storage Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080786D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bankowski, WF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) which cover a field area and are connected in the form of parallel shift registers, receive an image from an optical system. Light source 11 illuminates image 12, the reflection of which is focused onto CCD array 13 (see Fig. 1). The individual CCD cells 14 are capable of recording the image as charges within the cells.

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Charge Coupled Devices Optical Sensor Storage Device

Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) which cover a field area and are connected in the form of parallel shift registers, receive an image from an optical system. Light source 11 illuminates image 12, the reflection of which is focused onto CCD array 13 (see Fig. 1). The individual CCD cells 14 are capable of recording the image as charges within the cells.

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view of an individual CCD cell. An N-type semiconductor substrate 15 is covered with a thin oxide layer 16. Polysilicon gates or electrodes 17, 18 are located in layer 16. Superimposed on layer 16 are metal gates 19, 20 that are similar in size to gates 17, 18. Gates 17, 19, 18, 20 are arranged in sequence and constitute one bit of a shift register. The gates of the next cell are placed immediately adjacent to the preceding cell, for information shifting from one cell to the next.

Selected gates of the shift register are predisposed for a given time duration, to sense the optical image in potential wells (depletion regions) under the selected gates. For example, the voltage on all gates 17 is dropped to -10 volts, thus creating a potential well 21 under each of gates 17. These wells hold positive charge or minority carriers which constitute the information stored in the wells. A potential well is created under adjacent gates 19, by reducing their potential. Then the potential of gates 17 is increased to eliminate the wells under them.

As the potential on gates 17 is raised, the positive charge stored in the wells under gates 17 pours out of these wells into the newly created wells under gates
19. In this way, information is transferred from gate-to-gate and...