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Exhaust Tube Seal for Gas Panel Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080799D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Skolnik, MB: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In the fabrication of gas panel displays, two glass substrates having dielectric coated conductor arrays positioned orthogonal to each other are sealed about their edges, and the device filled with gas through a glass tubulation. One of the problems in fabricating this device is the tubulation seal which presents several problems. Using a vitreous sealing glass for example, particulate glass from the seal penetrates into the panel during the sealing of the tubulation, and the resulting impurity in the panel inhibits satisfactory operation. At other times sealing the exhaust tube into the gas panel display results in entrapped gases, bubbles, voids or material which falls during the sealing process into the panel. Two methods of prohibiting these problems are described.

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Exhaust Tube Seal for Gas Panel Display

In the fabrication of gas panel displays, two glass substrates having dielectric coated conductor arrays positioned orthogonal to each other are sealed about their edges, and the device filled with gas through a glass tubulation. One of the problems in fabricating this device is the tubulation seal which presents several problems. Using a vitreous sealing glass for example, particulate glass from the seal penetrates into the panel during the sealing of the tubulation, and the resulting impurity in the panel inhibits satisfactory operation. At other times sealing the exhaust tube into the gas panel display results in entrapped gases, bubbles, voids or material which falls during the sealing process into the panel. Two methods of prohibiting these problems are described.

Referring to Fig. 1, a glass substrate 1 has a stepped hole opening 3 adapted to contain an exhaust tubulation 5. When the exhaust tubulation is in the opening 3, a glass sealant material such as solder glass 7 is applied on the tubulation 5 in the desired pattern, by extruding or silk screening about the area to be sealed. The solder glass sealant 7 is then heated by furnace or torch to either sinter or reflow the sealant. After checking for voids, bubbles or contamination, the exhaust tube 3 is then placed into the stepped hole for sealing to the substrate 1 during the edge sealing oven cycle.

An alternate solution to the same problem is shown in Fig. 2, in...