Browse Prior Art Database

India Ink Plotting Accessory

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080862D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gross, PG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In presently known computer controlled plotters, the india ink accessory utilized therein requires constant supervision to effect even minimal reliable performance. With the accessory described herein, reliability of performance is substantially increased as compared to the reliability of performance of known accessories, while the required supervision and maintenance therefor is greatly minimized.

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India Ink Plotting Accessory

In presently known computer controlled plotters, the india ink accessory utilized therein requires constant supervision to effect even minimal reliable performance. With the accessory described herein, reliability of performance is substantially increased as compared to the reliability of performance of known accessories, while the required supervision and maintenance therefor is greatly minimized.

Reference is made to Figs. 1 and 2, wherein there is illustrated the known accessory of which there is a description hereinbelow. The designating uppercase alphabetic characters in the figures correspond to those set forth in the description.

Principle of Operation of Known Accessory.

A - Moving base to support writing device.

B - Sleeve that screws onto A.

C - Ink pen holder secured by B.

D - Upper part of pen holder unscrews from C to allow pen insertion.

E - Adjusting device which regulates the height of F.

F - Regulates size of an air gap in a magnetic circuit.

G - Moves up and down in a sleeve which is part of the magnetic circuit. In the up position G rests against F closing the air

gap in the magnetic circuit. If the circuit is turned off, G

moves down under its own weight and a spring pushing down

against the nut I, until the tip of H rests against the paper.

H - Graph-type pen tip that screws into G.

I - Nut screwed onto G. Downward spring rests against it. Holds ink reservoir K in place.

J - Material of very low-magnetic susceptibility on top of G. Its thickness determines the closest distance between G and F and

therefore, the maximum magnetic force holding up the pen. K - Plastic ink reservoir.

L - Ink.

M - Air inlet to allow emptying of ink reservoir as required for writing.

Principle Shown in Fig. 2.

A - H Same as in Fig. 1.

I - Nut screwed onto G. Downward spring rests against it.

J - Material of very low-magnetic susceptibility. Determines minimum

reluctance of gap, therefore maximum magnetic force on G as

before. It has been spread over full upper part of G, so it

rests

flatly against F and does not present any edges to F as before.

This makes the magnetic hold on G much more resistant against

vibrations due to lateral motions of A. The thickness of J has

also been adjusted for optimum magnetic force on G. In Fig. 1,

the vibrations would tear the pen away from F, thus causing it to

drop on the paper.

K - Stiff, short plastic tube fitted into G.

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L - Light plastic connector that slips onto K to allow assembly

or disassembly of inkline N from the pen.

M - Part of the inkline N which fits into L. It is semistiff so it will not conduct vibrations too well, but it will keep

itself from leaning against the inside of E.

N - Soft, plastic inkline allowing ink from reservoir P to flow flow into pen.

O - Thin hypodermic n...