Browse Prior Art Database

Multitasking Virtual Machine for Remote Small Computer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080863D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Guido, AA: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the technique described herein, there is effected the connection of small laboratory automation computers, such as the IBM S/7, to virtual machines operating under virtual operating systems such as the VM/370. With this connection, the virtual machine environment which is available to the general body of time sharing users is deployed to support users of the small automation computers.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Multitasking Virtual Machine for Remote Small Computer

In the technique described herein, there is effected the connection of small laboratory automation computers, such as the IBM S/7, to virtual machines operating under virtual operating systems such as the VM/370. With this connection, the virtual machine environment which is available to the general body of time sharing users is deployed to support users of the small automation computers.

In the technique, the small automation computer acts as a master station communicating with a host system virtual machine. Within the small computer one or more users are performing laboratory automation or process control tasks. 0n user demand, data are transferred between the small automation computer and user's file space via the slave virtual machine. Additionally, the user may request execution of a user-host program in his own separate virtual machine.

Within the purview of the described technique, as many user virtual machines can be operational as there are small automation computer users. Each user virtual machine is given equal time slices.

In the normal multiprogramming environment of laboratory automation computers, a user is assigned a priority and thus may receive substantially less service than others. Additionally, much greater resources are made available to each user.

The salient element in the technique described herein is a unique use of the virtual machine environment. Thus, the experimenter need no longer require large standalone computer systems with their attendant array of peripheral devices. Instead, small intelligent microcomputers may be used to service the realtime experimental events, with the host virtual machine prov...