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Magnetic Garnet Layering Anisotropy Varied by Rotation Rate and Quenching

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000080875D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cronemeyer, DC: AUTHOR

Abstract

The achievement of a considerable change of K(u) with rotation rate in a magnetic garnet film grown by liquid phase epitaxy, as described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 16, No. 9, February 1974, Page 3081 demonstrates that "growth" anisotropy, in the sense of microscopic site selectivity or atomic pairing, is probably not responsible for the major amount of the anisotropy which is found experimentally in the Eu:Ga:YIG system.

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Magnetic Garnet Layering Anisotropy Varied by Rotation Rate and Quenching

The achievement of a considerable change of K(u) with rotation rate in a magnetic garnet film grown by liquid phase epitaxy, as described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 16, No. 9, February 1974, Page 3081 demonstrates that "growth" anisotropy, in the sense of microscopic site selectivity or atomic pairing, is probably not responsible for the major amount of the anisotropy which is found experimentally in the Eu:Ga:YIG system.

It has been observed that the anisotropy increases with rotation rate, as shown in the drawing. At very high-rotation rates, the anisotropy again decreases. By postulation that the anisotropy is dependent upon Pb incorporated primarily in layers, then the spacing of these layers becomes approximately 150 Angstroms at rotation rates higher than 120 rpm compared with 300 angstroms spacing at slower rates. The drop in anisotropy at the highest rotation rates is explained by further postulating that the time during which the film is at high temperature, is sufficient for the Pb atoms to diffuse away from the planar growth arrays to a true atomic dispersion.

If the time at high temperatures is minimized, either by an increase of the vertical temperature gradient in the growth furnace, or by an enhancement of the effectiveness of the cooling of the substrate and hence the film by an increased cooling gas flow, then the film could be quenched more effectively...