Browse Prior Art Database

Card or Document Stop

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081024D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Foytlin, LF: AUTHOR

Abstract

The figure illustrates an improved card or document stop placed in the bed of a card or document transport machine. Whenever any form of paper document is transported or fed through a machine, (such as a punch, a printing press, or a card reader, etc.) the stopping, moving, and starting of the document usually require some clutching device. These operations, in turn are ordinarily mechanical or electromechanical and involve the movement of some mass which must be started or stopped very quickly. This requirement presents problems in response time of the mechanisms, in vibration, oscillation, wear, lubrication, adjustment,noise and in inaccuracy in positioning the document.

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Card or Document Stop

The figure illustrates an improved card or document stop placed in the bed of a card or document transport machine. Whenever any form of paper document is transported or fed through a machine, (such as a punch, a printing press, or a card reader, etc.) the stopping, moving, and starting of the document usually require some clutching device. These operations, in turn are ordinarily mechanical or electromechanical and involve the movement of some mass which must be started or stopped very quickly. This requirement presents problems in response time of the mechanisms, in vibration, oscillation, wear, lubrication, adjustment,noise and in inaccuracy in positioning the document.

The figure illustrates a design of a stopping mechanism for a document in which all rotating, cammed, and pivoted mass designs such as those commonly used are eliminated, while the document is still stopped within critical tolerances for registration with read heads, etc.

A free-floating armature 1 is positioned directly above a portion of the document feed path 2. The thin spring steel armature 1 actually rides on the top of a card or document, which is inserted from the left in the direction of the arrow. Armature 1 is freely maintained in position so that it can slide up and down through apertures in guide 3, to keep the card or other document in contact with the surface of the bed 4 on which it rides. Positioned directly beneath armature 1 are one or more electromagnet...