Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Mail Trayer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081104D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jackowski, CS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This apparatus can be used with automated document or mail sorting and handling equipment for the removal of documents in small amounts from sorter pockets, and their placement, gathered in correct sequence, into trays for subsequent handling or storage. The major problem has been that of automatically depositing the gathered documents into the trays without spilling or misarranging.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Mail Trayer

This apparatus can be used with automated document or mail sorting and handling equipment for the removal of documents in small amounts from sorter pockets, and their placement, gathered in correct sequence, into trays for subsequent handling or storage. The major problem has been that of automatically depositing the gathered documents into the trays without spilling or misarranging.

Documents arrive at the traying system in attitude controlled carriers 3 constructed, such that they can pass through an "L" shaped rake 5 depositing the documents thereon. Individual carriers 3 are spaced so as to allow the deposited documents to be swept off the rake 5 prior to the arrival of the next group. This allows continuous carrier motion during the operation.

Transfer (sweeping) from the rake 5 to the gathering (tray-load assembly) stacker 7 is effected by a mechanism, not shown, consisting of two arms which sweep alternately through the rake 5 pushing the deposited mail into the assembly stacker 7. The drive is mechanically synchronized with the carrier drive and motion is continuous during the operation. The documents are swept onto stacker floor fingers 11 which may be pushed down against a sectioned continuous restraint (resists being pushed down and does not spring back).

Immediately after transfer is complete, compactor fingers 13 push the packet of documents and the restrained floor fingers 11 down such that the top of the packet is slightly below the plane of the transfer floor. The distance the floor fingers 11 are pushed down is thus dependent upon the height of the packet transferred and is directly controlled by it. When a tray full of documents has been gathered, the floor fingers 11 strike a microswitch, not shown. This contact causes a clutched star wheel device to throw two fingers 15 and 17 onto the top of the stack. The first is a pusher which engages the drive and starts the stack and its floor fingers 11 downward toward the traying section. The second is a floor which engages the restraint, receives the oncoming document packet and begins a new gather. The already gathered stack continues to be pushed down the stacker onto the traying slide 19.

As the floor fingers 11 leading the gather near the stripping belts 21 at the far end of the traying slide 19, the restraint terminates. The floor fingers, now disengaged from the restraint, jump forward activating a switch, not shown, which stops the pusher drive. The f...