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Controlled Plating of a Corrosion Barrier on Metallized Ceramic Modules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081129D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schmeckenbecher, AF: AUTHOR

Abstract

With certain ceramic substrates, such as hot pressed alumina in combination with intricate conductor line patterns such as on photoetched metallized ceramic modules, the nickel plating tends to spread from the lands to the ceramic surface after a certain plating time. For example, in a path containing 0.5 gram/liter dimethylamine borane, 29 grams/liter nickelous sulfate hexahydrate,65 grams/liter sodium potassium tartrate and ammonium hydroxide to PH 10.5 at 50 degrees C, the spreading of the nickel plate becomes apparent typically after about an hour of plating.

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Controlled Plating of a Corrosion Barrier on Metallized Ceramic Modules

With certain ceramic substrates, such as hot pressed alumina in combination with intricate conductor line patterns such as on photoetched metallized ceramic modules, the nickel plating tends to spread from the lands to the ceramic surface after a certain plating time. For example, in a path containing 0.5 gram/liter dimethylamine borane, 29 grams/liter nickelous sulfate hexahydrate,65 grams/liter sodium potassium tartrate and ammonium hydroxide to PH 10.5 at 50 degrees C, the spreading of the nickel plate becomes apparent typically after about an hour of plating.

It has been found that plating of the ceramic surface can be avoided, if small amounts of cobalt ions, for example, 7 grams/liter cobalt chloride hexahydrate, are incorporated in the plating solution.

Cobalt is a much less active catalyst for the electroless (autocatalytic) reduction by dimethylamine borane than nickel. It acts as an easily controlled stabilizing agent and prevents spreading of the plate to the not activated ceramic surface, even after prolonged plating.

Ferrous or ferric ions and ions of other catalytically less active metals than nickel, similarly will act as stabilizing agents.

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