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Automatic Vocabulary Generation System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081222D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Howard, JK: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the storage of digitalized voice segments x, the pause accompanying the initial and termination of a voice sound may be stored in memory. In order to minimize the storage of noninformation such as pauses, it is desirable to uniquely detect the beginning and end of each specific word or phrase. This means that the beginning and end location should be as close as possible to the actual word start and stop. A voice actuated circuit is not well suited for this function because of the idle time, i.e., inertia.

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Automatic Vocabulary Generation System

In the storage of digitalized voice segments x, the pause accompanying the initial and termination of a voice sound may be stored in memory. In order to minimize the storage of noninformation such as pauses, it is desirable to uniquely detect the beginning and end of each specific word or phrase. This means that the beginning and end location should be as close as possible to the actual word start and stop. A voice actuated circuit is not well suited for this function because of the idle time, i.e., inertia.

The method comprises the steps of recording on a magnetic tape spoken words with a pause between each word; mechanically identifying the location of the word boundary along the recorded extent of the tape; prerecording a sine- wave tone along the extent of another magnetic tape; and mechanically merging, such as by splicing, the mechanically identified voice segments recorded on the first tape onto the second tape, preserving a predetermined recording distance between such spliced segments, whereby the intervoice segments are occupied only by the recorded sine-wave tone.

The recorded sine-wave tones can be used to gate any analog-to-digital device on or off and thus inhibit pause information from being recorded in the digital memory. Illustratively, if a delta modulator is gated on only upon receipt of the recorded tone and gated off upon receipt of a second tone, then the digit stream could be applied to a memory direct...