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Small Hole Drilling Jig

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081315D
Original Publication Date: 1974-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

White, TP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Drilling a plurality of small holes in the range of 0.0015-0.010 inch, accurately and repetitively at various locations on multiple pieces without drillwalk or chatter, is a difficult if not impossible task. A drill structure which gives to the operator the desired feel for both spotting a material and subsequent accurate drilling operations, is illustrated in Vol. 15, No. 11, April 1973, Pages 3518 and 3519 of the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin.

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Small Hole Drilling Jig

Drilling a plurality of small holes in the range of 0.0015-0.010 inch, accurately and repetitively at various locations on multiple pieces without drillwalk or chatter, is a difficult if not impossible task. A drill structure which gives to the operator the desired feel for both spotting a material and subsequent accurate drilling operations, is illustrated in Vol. 15, No. 11, April 1973, Pages 3518 and 3519 of the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin.

The utilization of this drill to permit repetitive operation of accurately located holes in a workpiece is shown in the drawing, wherein the drill 1A is shown positioned on one arm of a pantograph system, superimposed of a workpiece 2A which is located on an X-Y table. The positioning arm of the pantograph assembly is illustrated as engaging a template having a plurality of apertures therein, which are, in the present instance, at a ratio of 10 to 1 as to their desired position versus the position of the desired holes in the work piece 2A. The air chuck drill includes a handle by which reciprocation of the drill is effected, permitting the proper feel by the operator of the workpiece 2A as it is being drilled.

Because the workpiece is very small, the operator could be provided with a binocular type magnification system, but it has been found that a standard industrial television monitor and properly located screen inhibits operator fatigue.

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