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Magnetic Disk Servo Track Recording

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081343D
Original Publication Date: 1974-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Zimmermann, V: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Servo track writing of magnetic disks is carried out by writing a predetermined number of magnetic flux transitions on a disk track. Since it is difficult to ensure that the distances between the recorded signals are equal, a fixed number of signals is recorded. These signals have equal distances between succeeding signal transitions, and a larger gap between the beginning and the end of the track. In subsequent read/ record cycles this gap is eliminated by increasing the distances between the signal transitions.

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Magnetic Disk Servo Track Recording

Servo track writing of magnetic disks is carried out by writing a predetermined number of magnetic flux transitions on a disk track. Since it is difficult to ensure that the distances between the recorded signals are equal, a fixed number of signals is recorded. These signals have equal distances between succeeding signal transitions, and a larger gap between the beginning and the end of the track. In subsequent read/ record cycles this gap is eliminated by increasing the distances between the signal transitions.

Read signals A, scanned on a first recording track of a magnetic disk storage, are fed to the circuit in Fig. 1. This circuit causes the time intervals between the signals of the sequence to be changed, so that servo track write signals D are recorded on a second recording track.

Read signals A are fed to the input of the integrator (Fig. 1) generating the beginning and the end of a sawtooth signal B, by the leading edge of an A-signal and the leading edge of the subsequent A-signal, respectively. As the time intervals of the A-signals at the beginning of the sequence are identical, the amplitude values of sawtooth signals B are equally identical. The great time interval between two A-signals at the end of the sequence results in a high- amplitude value, the voltage rate of which exceeds the constant-amplitude values of the preceding sawtooth signals B by the value V. The gap detector, to which sawtooth signals B are applied, meas...