Browse Prior Art Database

Insertion Pocket for 12 Letter Per Second Inserter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081366D
Original Publication Date: 1974-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 153K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brende, AP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This pocket reliably inserts letters fed at a 12 per second rate into a U. S. Postal Service Letter Sort Machine (LSM). Letters fed at twelve per second by the Mail Transport Unit (MTU) are scanned and sorted sequentially into LSM Card Pockets 10, Fig. 1, by a horizontal inserter assembly containing forty-eight of these pockets. Each letter is eventually sorted to specific LSM sweep pockets 11 by a code wheel shaft encoded to the corresponding sweep pocket.

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Insertion Pocket for 12 Letter Per Second Inserter

This pocket reliably inserts letters fed at a 12 per second rate into a U. S. Postal Service Letter Sort Machine (LSM). Letters fed at twelve per second by the Mail Transport Unit (MTU) are scanned and sorted sequentially into LSM Card Pockets 10, Fig. 1, by a horizontal inserter assembly containing forty-eight of these pockets. Each letter is eventually sorted to specific LSM sweep pockets 11 by a code wheel shaft encoded to the corresponding sweep pocket.

The pockets 10 allow letters being transported at 18O inches per second to enter and remain within a pocket. The letters rest on pocket fingers 12 for approximately 1/3 second to allow letter oscillation to diminish. As the pockets 10 start to open at the first turn, Fig. 2, the letters drop to shear plate 13 beneath the pocket. The letters remain on the shear plate for 1/3 revolution of the pockets about the chain drive sprocket, until they reach the end of shear plate
13.

At this point, the letters are phased with the correct cart pocket 11 at which time they drop into the pocket. The drop is square and even, due to the pocket finger configuration along with the prescribed time delays during the initial part of the drop and after dropping to the shear plate 13. This allows stabilization of the letters before dropping into the cart pockets 11.

Letters are inserted into pockets 11 at a 7 1/2 degree angle to obtain friction damping along the back wall 14 as the letters enter. The back wall of the pocket has vertical ribs 15 which tend to keep letters from riding on a flush surface, thus preventing static charge problems. The inner wall 16 is tilted downward, which causes the letters to deflect slightly downward when they bounce backward off the inner wall 16 toward the outer wall 17 of the pocket and a pocket backstop strap, not shown. The projections 18 (Fig. 1) on the forward wall 19 provide a restriction which increases the damping, to stabilize the letter on entry and after bouncing back toward the outer pocket wall 17.

Fingers 12 provide a momentary floor on which the letters come to rest before starting their drop. The fi...