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Disjointed Parameter List Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081436D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brannon, TL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This concept, when implemented in an operating system control program, supports parameter lists composed on noncontiguous entries. Normally, a variable-length parameter list consists of any number of contiguous entries with the last entry having its high-order bit set to 1. If that parameter list must reside in storage which has a relatively small maximum block size, its length is restricted accordingly. Disjointed parameter list processing is intended to eliminate such a restriction without requiring the parameter list user to be sensitive to the chaining mechanism, which connects the physically separate parts of a logically single parameter list. This concept is useful for parameter lists which are built and maintained by the operating system to pass information to the user's program.

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Disjointed Parameter List Processing

This concept, when implemented in an operating system control program, supports parameter lists composed on noncontiguous entries. Normally, a variable-length parameter list consists of any number of contiguous entries with the last entry having its high-order bit set to 1. If that parameter list must reside in storage which has a relatively small maximum block size, its length is restricted accordingly. Disjointed parameter list processing is intended to eliminate such a restriction without requiring the parameter list user to be sensitive to the chaining mechanism, which connects the physically separate parts of a logically single parameter list. This concept is useful for parameter lists which are built and maintained by the operating system to pass information to the user's program.

The figure shows the structure of a disjointed parameter list. Each table is composed of a header section and an entries (parameter list) section. The first table is called a primary table and the others are called feeder tables. They are chained together to provide one logical table. Each header contains information about the status of the corresponding entries section, as well as a pointer to the next feeder table. The primary table header also contains information relative to the logical table as a whole. The user does not need header information and looks only at the entries section of the primary table.

A parameter list structured in this...