Browse Prior Art Database

Visual Voltage Detection System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081462D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Densmore, W: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Described is a testing system by means of which surface voltage distributions can be visually displayed. An electro-optical transducer translates surface potentials into a visual effect. The transducer is a dipole suspension. When field-sensitive dipoles, in a liquid suspension, are placed within an electric field the otherwise randomly oriented dipoles become oriented along field lines. Those of them which are aligned along line of sight produce a transparent region within opaque suspension. This voltage induced transparency displays in a visual form localized distributions.

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Visual Voltage Detection System

Described is a testing system by means of which surface voltage distributions can be visually displayed. An electro-optical transducer translates surface potentials into a visual effect. The transducer is a dipole suspension. When field-sensitive dipoles, in a liquid suspension, are placed within an electric field the otherwise randomly oriented dipoles become oriented along field lines. Those of them which are aligned along line of sight produce a transparent region within opaque suspension. This voltage induced transparency displays in a visual form localized distributions.

One arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 in which a pattern electrode is disposed on a substrate. A dipole suspension layer is sandwiched between the substrate and a transparent reference electrode. A voltage applied across the electrodes results in a linear field distribution between the electrodes, which is visible to the naked eye viewing the suspension layer.

The view of the field in Fig. 1 is restricted by the package surrounding the suspension layer. In Fig. 2 this problem is avoided, by placing the reference electrode beneath the substrate and using a suspension layer which maintains its form. A fringing field is established between the reference electrode and the patter electrode.

That portion of the field above the substrate at and off the edges of the pattern electrode produces an optical effect in the suspension layer, which is observable by the naked eye...