Browse Prior Art Database

Visual Voltage Measurement Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081463D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lukianoff, GV: AUTHOR

Abstract

The dipole suspension described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 17, No. 1, June 1974, pages 98 and 99 can be utilized in a system for measuring surface voltage distributions. It has been found that the transparency of the suspension layer, when deposited over a voltage-energized surface, depends on the field strength (applied voltage).

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Visual Voltage Measurement Technique

The dipole suspension described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 17, No. 1, June 1974, pages 98 and 99 can be utilized in a system for measuring surface voltage distributions. It has been found that the transparency of the suspension layer, when deposited over a voltage-energized surface, depends on the field strength (applied voltage).

The functional relationship between the applied voltage and the transparency can be established by the system shown in the figure.

The sample, which corresponds to Fig. 2 of the above-mentioned publication, is scanned by a light source through optical microscope 2. The voltage applied across the electrodes is varied systematically. The optical output is transmitted to a photodetector that converts the radiation to an electric signal, which is a function of the input voltage. The signals from the photodetector are suitably amplified and shaped in the Processing Electronics. The shaped signal undergoes a level comparison, according to the calibration of the voltage source in the Calibration Data block prior to being measured.

Although the dipole suspension is the preferred transducer, any suitable transducer having an opacity or optical density which varies as a function of applied voltage can be used.

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