Browse Prior Art Database

Integrated Circuit Device Recovery and Restoration Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081471D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Totta, PA: AUTHOR

Abstract

In integrated circuit mounting and packaging operations, the situation arises wherein good devices must be removed from the supporting substrates because of diagnostic difficulties, defective substrates, engineering changes, etc. These good devices will normally have significant value provided that they can be made equivalent to new devices and reused. This process proposes the treating and reprocessing of integrated circuit devices that have been solder mounted to a substrate.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Integrated Circuit Device Recovery and Restoration Technique

In integrated circuit mounting and packaging operations, the situation arises wherein good devices must be removed from the supporting substrates because of diagnostic difficulties, defective substrates, engineering changes, etc. These good devices will normally have significant value provided that they can be made equivalent to new devices and reused. This process proposes the treating and reprocessing of integrated circuit devices that have been solder mounted to a substrate.

In this process, the device must be removed from the substrate by severing the solder connection. This can be achieved by utilizing a vacuum needle 10 making contact to the top side of device 12, while applying heat to the solder bonds with suitable heating such as microflame, IR heating, and the like.

After the device 12 has been removed from the module, the chip still supported by vacuum needle 10 is placed on an appropriate solid surface 14 that is sponge-like, perforated, or has aligned holes as shown in Fig. 1. A vacuum is applied to the chamber 15 beneath the sponge-like material of 14 while heat is applied to the device by flames 18, which removes the major portion of the solder from solder pads 20. The condition of the pads 20 on device 12 after this step would be one of being lightly tinned with a uniform coating of solder.

Subsequently, the device 12 is aligned and placed on a substrate 22 having solder pads 24 supported thereon in the configuration of the solder pads 20 on device 12. The solder pattern 24 on support 22, which could...