Browse Prior Art Database

Dual Force Automatic Rekeying

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081500D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fox, JE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Mechanical keyboards have often provided an automatic rekeying operation which will repeat the data for the key pressed, when the operator either pushes harder on the key or holds it down beyond a time-out period. In electronic keyboards, where a switch is closed rather than mechanical actuation of some element, this function has sometimes been provided by having the operator hold down the key beyond the time-out period, and has sometimes been provided by adding extra mechanisms which can be overcome by the operator pressing harder on the key.

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Dual Force Automatic Rekeying

Mechanical keyboards have often provided an automatic rekeying operation which will repeat the data for the key pressed, when the operator either pushes harder on the key or holds it down beyond a time-out period. In electronic keyboards, where a switch is closed rather than mechanical actuation of some element, this function has sometimes been provided by having the operator hold down the key beyond the time-out period, and has sometimes been provided by adding extra mechanisms which can be overcome by the operator pressing harder on the key.

In electronic keyboards which do not make electrical contact, but merely displace a coupling element, such as capacitive keyboards, the function of an automatic repeat entry has required, in the past, a timeout circuit and additional logic and electronics to sense that a key has been held down for a sufficient amount of time. Only a few keys on a typical keyboard have thus been provided with this function.

Fig. 1 illustrates a mechanism which, by the addition of a small shorting clip, provides, in combination with a force-overriding member that can be compressed upon the operators pressing the key harder, an automatic reentry operation with dual-force characteristics. The housing 1 contains capacitive coupling elements or some other electronic sensing device or contacts, as desired. Spring 2 is typically the key button return spring and insert 3 is what is used to connect the key button 9 to the plunger 4, for providing mechanical force to the element to be moved inside of housing 1.

0-ring 5, or other suitable damper, is often included to prevent impact forces when the key button 9 is depressed beyond the limit of spring 2. The shorting clip 6 has an aperture 7, which allows it to fit over the top of the insert 3 once the key button, 9 has been removed. The key button may then be replaced, holding shorting clip 6 in position.

Turning to Fig. 2, an illustration is given of the top of a typical keyboard modified to utilize the present device. Conductors A and B run parallely beside the rows of key module holes in the top of the...