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Superconducting Microcircuitry in Layered Compounds Using Ion Implantation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081536D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harris, EP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A number of transition metal dichalcogenide layered compounds, which can be readily grown as good single-crystal platelets of up to lcm in area, are superconductors. Their superconducting properties can be modified by intercalation; i.e., doping, where the dopant atoms are located in the gaps between the layers. For example, the transition temperature of pure TaS(2), which currently appears to be the most favorable material for the realization of this device, is 0.7 degrees K and can be raised to above 4.2 degrees K by intercalating with a number of metal ions; e.g., Pb, Hg, Sn, Te.

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Superconducting Microcircuitry in Layered Compounds Using Ion Implantation

A number of transition metal dichalcogenide layered compounds, which can be readily grown as good single-crystal platelets of up to lcm in area, are superconductors. Their superconducting properties can be modified by intercalation; i.e., doping, where the dopant atoms are located in the gaps between the layers. For example, the transition temperature of pure TaS(2), which currently appears to be the most favorable material for the realization of this device, is 0.7 degrees K and can be raised to above 4.2 degrees K by intercalating with a number of metal ions; e.g., Pb, Hg, Sn, Te.

Superconducting microcircuits containing Josephson effect devices (i.e., weak links) may be produced in layered compounds such as TaS(2), by ion implantation of patterns of dopant atoms. Superconducting microcircuits containing weak links have important applications in computer technology and electronics; a simple microcircuit, known as a SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) and consisting of a pair of weak links 1 disposed in parallel relationship and fed from a source of current, 1, is shown schematically in Fig. 1. Such microcircuits may be operated at 4.2 degrees K by utilizing the unique superconducting properties of layered compounds such as TaS(2). Undoped TaS(2) is not superconducting at 4.2 degrees K.

Current-carrying paths 2 which are superconducting at 4.2 degrees K are formed by ion i...