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Dry Processed Thin Film Photographic Medium

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081547D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gambino, RJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The advantages of the silver halide photographic media in terms of sensitivity are well known. Conventional media, i.e., silver halide crystals in gelatin are limited in resolution for the following reasons: (1) Raleigh scattering at grain-gelatin interfaces. (2) Swelling of the gelatin upon development. (3) Films less than 8 mum thick are difficult to manufacture. The ideal thickness for NA-1 objective would be 0.4 mum. Thin vacuum deposited films should meet the necessary requirements.

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Dry Processed Thin Film Photographic Medium

The advantages of the silver halide photographic media in terms of sensitivity are well known. Conventional media, i.e., silver halide crystals in gelatin are limited in resolution for the following reasons:
(1) Raleigh scattering at grain-gelatin interfaces.
(2) Swelling of the gelatin upon development.
(3) Films less than 8 mum thick are difficult to manufacture.

The ideal thickness for NA-1 objective would be 0.4 mum.

Thin vacuum deposited films should meet the necessary

requirements.

J. Malinowski (1) has addressed this problem by evaporating a "monolayer" of silver over an evaporated film of PbI. The photogeneration of holes is used to destroy the silver monolayer in selected areas. The event is summarized as follows: Pb/+/I/-/ + h Nu --> Pb(Lattice) + I/-/ + P/+/ P/+/ + I/-/(surface) --> I degrees, (surface) I degrees (surface) + Ag degree surface) --> Ag/+/I/-/.

The sensitivity of these films was low. Satisfactory contrast was obtained only on films that were deposited on conductive substrates or heated to 180 degrees C during exposure. The quality of the image was further limited by the change in absorption or reflection that could occur in one monolayer of silver.

Vacuum evaporated thin films of AgI and AgBr, by the addition of various amounts of Ag, Se or Cd, can be tailored in contrast, permanence and sensitivity.

Silver iodide undergoes a crystalographic transformation at ~ 150 degrees C. Additions of up to...