Browse Prior Art Database

Pin Pad Contacter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081646D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Faure, LH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The contacter, as shown in the figure, consists of double-buckling beam contacts 2 which are inserted sideways into molded or machined slots in plastic beam holders 3 which are stacked, doweled, and clamped together in a frame 4. The ends 5 and 6 of the beams or contacts 2 extend slightly beyond the holders 3 and frame 4. The contacter is clamped to a test equipment printed-circuit board, not shown.

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Pin Pad Contacter

The contacter, as shown in the figure, consists of double-buckling beam contacts 2 which are inserted sideways into molded or machined slots in plastic beam holders 3 which are stacked, doweled, and clamped together in a frame 4. The ends 5 and 6 of the beams or contacts 2 extend slightly beyond the holders 3 and frame 4.

The contacter is clamped to a test equipment printed-circuit board, not shown.

The lower ends 5 of the contacts or beams 2 contact pads on the test equipment board. The lower portions of the beams buckle to provide the contact forces. The upper and lower buckling portions 7 bow in the direction of the arrow. The module or product to be tested is held against the upper ends 6 of the beams 2 by vacuum or by mechanical clamping. Contact forces against the product pads are provided by the buckling of the upper portions of the beams 2.

The beams 2 are made by flattening round wire to produce a retangular cross section. This rectangular cross section with a slight prebow is used to control the direction in which the beams 2 buckle. Unflattened round wire with prebow is acceptable in some applications. Other conductive materials such as copper, tungsten, beryllium-nickel, etc. can be used. The beam holders 3 can be machined or produced in large quantities by molding. The use of machined or molded guide slots makes it easy to assemble the beams 2 into the holders 3.

A beam and holder subassembly offers another application as miniature ...