Browse Prior Art Database

Measuring Distortions in Ceramic Green Sheet

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081647D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gardner, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A problem that exists in the development and manufacture of multilayer ceramic substrates, is how to assess the effects of manual and automated handling and manipulation of ceramic green sheets on the dimensions of the green sheet. The dimensions of the sheets are critical, since any distortions of the sheet can cause layer-to-layer misalignment when the sheets are laminated. This can be a cause of module failure.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 74% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Measuring Distortions in Ceramic Green Sheet

A problem that exists in the development and manufacture of multilayer ceramic substrates, is how to assess the effects of manual and automated handling and manipulation of ceramic green sheets on the dimensions of the green sheet. The dimensions of the sheets are critical, since any distortions of the sheet can cause layer-to-layer misalignment when the sheets are laminated. This can be a cause of module failure.

Static methods of distortion measurements are not always desirable or possible, since they are time-consuming and require costly optical devices. Even sophisticated optical devices are not capable of measuring the dynamic displacements that can occur during green sheet handling and processing.

Continuous monitoring of green sheet displacements during manipulative operations is possible using a process, which consists of floating an epoxy- backed strain gage on the ceramic green sheet during the casting operation. The green sheet is wetted with solvent and dissolved binder at the time of gage placement and the gage is wet by the green sheet binder. The green sheet binder thus provides the adhesive for the strain gage. The sheet with attached gage is then allowed to dry.

Electrical leads can then be attached to the gage. The leads are connected to a strain indicator and the strain indicator to either a recorder or an oscilloscope. Any disturbance in the green sheet resulting from manipulation is rapidly and acc...