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Removing Quartz Flakes from Surfaces by Sound Energy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081649D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hafner, B: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

During quartz sputtering, the quartz sputtered from the target is not only deposited on the substrates to be covered with a passivation layer, but also on the tooling surfaces inside the reaction chamber. This deposit, though not adhering too strongly to the tooling surfaces, is difficult to remove without disassembling the whole system. However, the deposit tends to come off as quartz flakes during subsequent sputtering runs, contaminating the substrate surfaces.

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Removing Quartz Flakes from Surfaces by Sound Energy

During quartz sputtering, the quartz sputtered from the target is not only deposited on the substrates to be covered with a passivation layer, but also on the tooling surfaces inside the reaction chamber. This deposit, though not adhering too strongly to the tooling surfaces, is difficult to remove without disassembling the whole system. However, the deposit tends to come off as quartz flakes during subsequent sputtering runs, contaminating the substrate surfaces.

This "flaking" during sputtering can be drastically reduced by the following method: before each sputtering run, a loudspeaker is closely connected to the reaction chamber in such a manner that its sound energy (preferred frequency range from 0.2 to 20 kcps) is able to excite vibrations in the tooling and in the gas atmosphere in the reaction chamber. This vibration causes flakes and poorly adhering quartz to burst off the tooling surfaces. The dropped off quartz particles are subsequently removed by a vacuum cleaner. The adherence of the remaining quartz deposit is such that it will not come off during the subsequent run.

The method is not confined to the removal of quartz flakes; it is invariably useful in cases where brittle particles not adhering too strongly are to be removed from surfaces.

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