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Connection Requesting in a Telecommunication Access Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081695D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Black, G: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The ability for a terminal operator to request the use of an application has been called "logon". The ability for an application to request the use of a terminal has been called "allocation". There is a relationship, in that logon and allocation are aspects of some larger capability. This capability is called "connection".

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Connection Requesting in a Telecommunication Access Method

The ability for a terminal operator to request the use of an application has been called "logon". The ability for an application to request the use of a terminal has been called "allocation". There is a relationship, in that logon and allocation are aspects of some larger capability. This capability is called "connection".

The direction in which the connection is initiated is not the only criterion however. A connection also depends on whether the source of the request for connection demands the actual presence of the destination, or whether some system representation of that destination will suffice. For example, a terminal may wish to enter data into the system during the day, for overnight processing by some application, that is, the terminal does not require the presence of the application.

Alternatively, the terminal may wish to interact with the application in such a manner that there is an uninterruptable bidirectional flow of data between the terminal and the application; clearly the presence of both parties is essential. The situation in which the connection-initiating party demands the presence of the requested party is termed "forming a physical connection"; when the presence of the requested party is not required, the situation is termed "forming a logical connection".

The logical connection is a two-stage process. For example, a logical connection between a terminal and an application implies (1) a physical connection between the terminal and some intermediate point, and (2) a subsequent physical connection between that intermediate point and the application. The second stage may be started before the first stage has completed, but this is not essential.

Another factor in forming the connection is whether the required party has to indicate its willingness to complete the connection. For example, an application may wish to logically connect to a terminal in order to send it some data, but (1) may only expect that connection to complete when the terminal instructs the system that it is prepared and willing to receive that data, or (2) cause the system to send the data to the terminal when it becomes available (that is, not connected else-where). This is termed forming a connection (either physical or logical) with or without the consent of the desired party.

In the example above, the application may have the authorization (as defined interpreted by a specific installation) to request connection with the desired terminal to become involved; that is, there is a distinction between getting consent and getting authorization. When consent is required, the desired party must indicate his preparedness by accepting the connection.

Allocation in an operating system sense is the case of an application requesting the use of a terminal without its consent. Also, there is the case of several applications sending batches of output to the same terminal: these applic...