Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Generation of Three Dimensional Depictions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000081706D
Original Publication Date: 1974-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-28
Document File: 3 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appel, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the field of computer graphics, a particular problem is encountered in the depiction of the molecular motion of atoms in a lattice because of the complexity of detail involved. There is described herein a technique which enables the depiction of surrounding atoms in a set of atoms, to enable the visualizing of internal details.

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Computer Generation of Three Dimensional Depictions

In the field of computer graphics, a particular problem is encountered in the depiction of the molecular motion of atoms in a lattice because of the complexity of detail involved. There is described herein a technique which enables the depiction of surrounding atoms in a set of atoms, to enable the visualizing of internal details.

It is well known that computer generated depictions of molecules or sets of atoms can be very dense, if the atoms are drawn as spheres. If all of the spheres are drawn in a given set of atoms, then the generated depiction appears as a gray cloud. In addition, if a hidden line method is implemented which draws only those sections of the spheres which are visible to an observer, then events of interest that are internal to molecular or crystal structure are obscured.

The technique described herein is a practical and economical method which enables the preserving of the sense of depth provided by hidden line techniques, but also makes possible the perception of internal events. The technique described herein, in addition to its applicability to the depiction of atomic and molecular structures and crystals, also finds ready application in situations where it is desired to preserve the sense of depth and yet to observe internal events.

In the carrying out of the technique for providing the depiction, the following rules for rendering obtain:
1. Each object (sphere, atom, etc.) is assigned a brightness

parameter.
2. Each object (sphere, atom, etc.) is assigned a chosen

opacity parameter.
3. The orthographic or perspective projection of points on the

object to be depicted are calculated.
4. The object lines are decomposed into small segments having

a size such that lengths of these line segments are equal

to the resolution which is desired.
5. Each line segment is tested to dete...